3 Vegan Sunday Brunch Recipes

3 Vegan Sunday Brunch Recipes

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We all love a nice Sunday brunch, so here is a collection of our top brunch recipes for you to make this weekend!
Peanut Butter Waffles

Makes 4 six-inch round waffles or 6 four-inch square ones

When faced with figuring out a way to fit peanut butter into brunch, these waffles become the obvious choice. Use chunky peanut butter for the most intense peanutty taste. The batter is really thick and also very forgiving—you can use practically any flour and they still come out great! But don’t go trying that with every recipe; these are special.

Ingredients:

  • ¾ cup chunky natural peanut butter
  • 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 2 cups soy milk
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 2¼ cups white whole wheat flour
    (all-purpose or whole wheat pastry flour work, too)
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg (use fresh grated if you can)
  • Cooking spray

Preheat your waffle iron. In a large mixing bowl, mix together peanut butter, maple syrup, and canola oil until well combined. Separately, mix together the milk and cornstarch in a measuring cup and add to the batter along with the vanilla. Add flour, baking powder, salt, and nutmeg and mix until the batter is relatively smooth. Spray the waffle iron with cooking spray and cook waffles according to manufacturer’s directions.


The Waffle Truth

I remember the first time someone told me they made their own waffles. I was shocked. I was dismissive. I remember asking, “But are they good?” I just couldn’t believe that something requiring such complicated machinery was within my reach. And once I tried it myself I was addicted. Don’t make the same mistake I did and waste your life being intimidated by a gadget— dive in with a waffle maker. Here are a few tips I’ve picked up along the way.

  1. Just following orders—read your waffle maker directions Waffle irons differ so drastically from iron to iron that I can’t give directions for the actual waffle making process, so I just end each recipe with “cook waffles according to manufacturer’s directions.” But generally you grease the iron, pour the batter in, and close the lid. You know it’s ready when the light either goes off or comes on, depending on your waffle maker. A general rule of thumb is that when the waffle  stops steaming you know it’s done. Remember to always give your iron plenty of time to heat up and to grease it between every waffle, no exceptions. That gets you a nice crispy outside.
  2. Love will tear us apart—and our waffl es It happens to the best of us. You smell all that waffle-y goodness, lift the lid, and … OUCH! The top of the waffle rips right off, revealing the soft, delicate, and now useless insides. There are a few reasons this might happen. Numero uno is that the waffle wasn’t done cooking. If you have a heat dial on your iron, turn it down a bit, so that the outside won’t cook way before the inside. Another culprit might be a batter that is too thick. Add a few tablespoons of liquid and see if that helps the next one. And did you remember to grease the waffle iron between every waffle?
  3. You should only be able to see through the waffle if you’re Superman Yes, unless you have X-ray vision, your waffle shouldn’t be transparent or have any holes in it. This means your batter was way too thin. Add a few tablespoons of flour and try again!
  4. Too much of a good thing—don’t overfill your waffle iron Use a measuring cup to pour your batter so that you know how much is the right amount for your iron. Overfilling can lead to many a waffle crime such as rippages, raw or undercooked sides, and just big fat messes. Usually a scant one cup of batter is good for a 6-inch waffle iron.
  5. To spread or not to spread? I say don’t try to spread the batter out. Just drop it into the center of the iron and let the waffle iron do the work. Once you close the lid the batter will spread out all on its own. Of course, it sucks to waste waffle batter and it’s nice to know if you’re in for any trouble before you begin cooking. If you’re feeling super-paranoid, or you’re working with a new waffle iron, you can do a test. Just pour 2 tablespoons of batter into the iron and make a little mini-waffle to see how it comes out.

Cornbread Waffles

Makes 6 six-inch round waffles or 8 four-inch square ones

Who can resist cornbread in the morning? These waffles are nice and dense yet somehow still light and airy. It sounds impossible but try them and see. For savory waffles, just reduce the sugar by two tablespoons.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups almond milk (or your favorite nondairy milk)
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1½ cups cornmeal
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup sugar (or 2 tablespoons sugar if making savory waffles)
  • ¼ cup canola oil
  • Cooking spray

Preheat your waffle iron. Measure out the milk in a large measuring cup and add the vinegar to it. Set mixture aside to curdle. In a large mixing bowl, mix together cornmeal, flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar. Make a well in the center and add the milk mixture and oil. Mix together until relatively smooth. Spray the waffle iron with cooking spray and cook waffles according to manufacturer’s directions.

Buckwheat Waffles

Makes 6 six-inch round waffles or 8 four-inch square ones

Buckwheat has a distinctively nutty taste. Whenever I cook with it, the kitchen smells so pleasantly warm and homey, it makes me feel like I’m back in Mother Russia and getting a big hug from my grandma. Or at a really swank brunch joint on the Lower East Side getting pissed off at all the supermodels surrounding me and the tiny chairs that only fi t half my butt.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup almond milk (or nondairy milk of your choice)
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
  • ¾ cup buckwheat flour
  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons sugar (for savory waffles, reduce to 1 teaspoon)
  • ¼ cup oil
  • Cooking spray

Measure out the milk and water and add the vinegar to it. Set aside to curdle. In a large mixing bowl, mix together buckwheat, flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar. Make a well in the center and add the milk mixture and oil. Mix together until relatively smooth. Let batter rest for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat your waffle iron. Spray the waffle iron with cooking spray and cook waffles according to manufacturer’s directions.

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